Unlocking the Power of Senolytics: Targeting Zombie Cells for Healthier Aging

Various research studies trying to explore the ways to kill (Zombie cells) senescent cells
Mayo clinic's scientists have found that combination of two compounds dasatinib and quercetin can kill the Zombie cells.
Mayo clinic's scientists have found that combination of two compounds dasatinib and quercetin can kill the Zombie cells.(Representational image: Unsplash)

Have you ever wondered if you stop can aging? Scientists are now trying to find out the ways to kill senescent cells to do so.

After combining the two compounds, dasatinib and quercetin, they found their great potential to increase running endurance, refresh hearts, and kill senescent cells in aged mice.

Now researchers are trying to kill the senescent cells by developing and testing new drugs with senolytic properties to achieve success in treating Alzheimer's disease, lung, kidney, and aging-like conditions.

Zombie cells are developed either after the cells undergo various cell divisions and enter replicative senescence or by the damage caused to DNA due to UV light.
Zombie cells are developed either after the cells undergo various cell divisions and enter replicative senescence or by the damage caused to DNA due to UV light.(Representational Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Senescent cells are also known by the name of zombie cells; these are developed either after the cells undergo various cell divisions and enter replicative senescence, which is a non-dividing state, or by the damage caused to DNA due to UV light, which further causes telomere shortening due to the absence of telomerase enzymes in continuing cell divisions or damage to DNA. Basically, telomerase is the enzyme that helps maintain the length of the telomeres of DNA in ongoing cell divisions.

In the ongoing research, scientists revealed that zombie cells secrete a variety of proteins that can act as senescence biomarkers. Further, these biomarkers can act as indicators of aging and can predict health outcomes in older people, furthermore analyzing these in the blood can increase the prediction of mortality.

It is found that some of the biomarkers like VEGFA,  GDF15, PARC, and MMP2 are connected with higher rates of mortality and the growth of various chronic diseases like cancer and heart diseases.

One more research study published in nature defines the earlier unknown processes in zombie cells. The study reveals that the powerhouse of the cells, "mitochondria,” can play an essential role in the initiation of the mechanism of apoptosis in senescent cells, which resist dying. Scientists observed a small mitochondrial group initiating apoptosis in senescent cells by releasing their DNA in the cytosol into the senescent cells. DNA inside the mitochondria is considered alien DNA by the cells, as they were once independent bacteria that is why when DNA of mitochondria enters into the cell it causes inflammation inside the cell leading to tissue damage.

Mitochondria can play an essential role in the initiation of the apoptosis mechanism in senescent cells, which resist dying. Scientists observed a small mitochondrial group initiating apoptosis in zombie cells by releasing their DNA in their cytosol.
Mitochondria can play an essential role in the initiation of the apoptosis mechanism in senescent cells, which resist dying. Scientists observed a small mitochondrial group initiating apoptosis in zombie cells by releasing their DNA in their cytosol.(Representational Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Moreover, they discovered that mice the same age as a 70-year-old person by stopping this process can decrease tissue inflammation and boost their strength, bone structure, and body balance.

In conclusion, continuous research studies focused on eliminating senescent cells show promise for novel therapies that may considerably enhance long-term health and quality of life.

Input from various sources.

(Rehash/Akashita Panjla)

Mayo clinic's scientists have found that combination of two compounds dasatinib and quercetin can kill the Zombie cells.
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