2 out of the 47 girls admitted from Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute’s girls' hostel test positive for cholera (Representative image: Unsplash)
2 out of the 47 girls admitted from Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute’s girls' hostel test positive for cholera (Representative image: Unsplash)

Bengaluru on Alert as a Few Test Positive for Cholera

Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal disease that requires urgent medical attention as it can kill within hours if left untreated.

According to sources, 47 students from Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute’s (BMCRI) Kaveri Girls Hostel were admitted to Victoria Hospital, Bangalore, on April 5 after complaining of vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. 2 out of the 47 girls tested positive for cholera (Ogawa serotype).

Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal disease that requires urgent medical attention as it can kill within hours if left untreated.

Following the positive case reports, the hostel kitchen was closed down and thoroughly disinfected. Meanwhile, the Victoria Hospital kitchen supplied food and water for the hostel residents. However, the hostel’s water sample has tested negative for cholera so far.

The Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) has been asked to increase water chlorination and monitor the final water distribution to meet regulatory standards. (Representative image: Pixabay)
The Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) has been asked to increase water chlorination and monitor the final water distribution to meet regulatory standards. (Representative image: Pixabay)

Earlier, two paying guest (PG) residents from Malleshwaram had also tested positive for cholera. It was reported that the PG owner association of Bangalore has put up guidelines for owners running boarding properties.

Cholera is a bacterial infection caused by Vibrio cholerae. It is spread through the consumption of contaminated water or food.

The Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) has been asked to increase water chlorination and monitor the final water distribution to meet regulatory standards.

The Karnataka Health Department has said that this cannot be termed an outbreak, emphasizing the sporadicity of the cases. (Representative image: Unsplash)
The Karnataka Health Department has said that this cannot be termed an outbreak, emphasizing the sporadicity of the cases. (Representative image: Unsplash)

The Karnataka Health and Family Welfare Department has confirmed six positive cholera cases this year in the state as of April 5, out of which five were reported in March. The Karnataka Health Department has said that this cannot be termed an outbreak, emphasizing the sporadicity of the cases.


Sources have reported that, amid Bangalore’s current water scarcity this summer, the risk of transmission of this waterborne disease seems concerning. 

(Input from various sources) 

(Rehash/Dr. Yogeeta V H/MSM)

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