Excessive Intake of Salt May Increase the Risk of Skin Irritation, Study Finds

A Big Mac, a hamburger offered by the global fast food company McDonald's, or half a teaspoon of table salt both contain around one gram of sodium
Research has demonstrated that eating fast food, which is known to have high levels of sodium in the diet, raises a teen's risk of developing eczema, particularly in  severe cases. (Representational image: Unsplash)
Research has demonstrated that eating fast food, which is known to have high levels of sodium in the diet, raises a teen's risk of developing eczema, particularly in severe cases. (Representational image: Unsplash)

According to a recent study, eating a lot of salt, which contains high quantities of sodium, may raise your chance of developing eczema, an inflammatory skin condition characterized by dry, itchy spots. Studies in the past have discovered a connection between skin sodium levels and autoimmune diseases as well as chronic inflammatory disorders like eczema. Additionally, research has demonstrated that eating fast food, which is known to have high levels of sodium in the diet, raises a teen's risk of developing eczema, particularly in severe cases.

In accordance with a recent study, eating even one gram more of sodium than is recommended daily can raise the risk of eczema flare-ups by 22%. A Big Mac, a hamburger offered by the global fast food company McDonald's, or half a teaspoon of table salt both contain around one gram of sodium.

The National Health Service of the United Kingdom recommends 2.3 grams of sodium per day, although the World Health Organization advises consuming fewer than two grams. 
(Representational image: Pixabay)
The National Health Service of the United Kingdom recommends 2.3 grams of sodium per day, although the World Health Organization advises consuming fewer than two grams. (Representational image: Pixabay)

The National Health Service of the United Kingdom recommends 2.3 grams of sodium per day, although the World Health Organization advises consuming fewer than two grams.

According to the study's researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), in the US, chronic skin conditions have become increasingly prevalent recently, particularly in industrialized nations, suggesting that lifestyle and environmental variables like nutrition may have an impact.

Thus, they suggested that cutting back on sodium consumption would be a simple strategy for eczema sufferers to control their condition. The results have been published in the Dermatology section of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Research has demonstrated that eating fast food, which is known to have high levels of sodium in the diet, raises a teen's risk of developing eczema, particularly in  severe cases. (Representational image: Unsplash)
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"Eczema flares can be difficult for patients to cope with, especially when they are unable to anticipate them and don't have recommendations on what they can do to avoid them."

Katrina Abuabara, ,study's corresponding author, an associate professor of dermatology at UCSF

The researchers collected urine samples and computerized medical information from over two lakh individuals between the ages of thirty and seventy-nine from the UK Biobank for their study.

The researchers determined each participant's sodium intake by analyzing the urine samples. They were able to determine the participant's diagnosis of atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, and the extent of the condition from the medical data.

The researchers discovered that a gram of salt consumed in excess of what was advised increased the risk of the skin condition by 22%.

Future studies, they continued, might examine limiting daily dietary salt intake as an eczema intervention.

(Input from various sources)

(Rehash/Priyanka Pandey/MSM)

Research has demonstrated that eating fast food, which is known to have high levels of sodium in the diet, raises a teen's risk of developing eczema, particularly in  severe cases. (Representational image: Unsplash)
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