Shamita Shetty Undergoes Surgery for Endometriosis; Shares Awareness

A chronic disorder known as endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue, which resembles the lining of the uterus, develops outside the organ
Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 per cent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” (Representational image: Wikimedia commons)
Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 per cent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” (Representational image: Wikimedia commons)

Actress Shamita Shetty recently shared a heartfelt hospital video to raise awareness about endometriosis, a condition she has been diagnosed with. Filmed by her sister Shilpa Shetty, the video captures Shamita discussing her surgery experience and expressing gratitude to her doctors for their diagnosis and care. Shamita urged women to educate themselves about this often misunderstood condition.

In the video, Shamita is seen in a hospital bed with Shilpa commenting humorously, “What a view... Waah, Kya hua hai." Shamita responds, “I have endometriosis, I didn’t even know what it was. All the women out there, please google endometriosis. You need to know what this problem is all about.” Shilpa then asks why it is important to know about endometriosis. Shamita explains, “Because you probably have it and you don’t even know you have it and it is painful. It’s uncomfortable.”

Shamita also shared a crucial message: “The pain in the body is for a reason, listen to your body.” The video concludes with Shilpa saying, “Swasth raho mast raho.” In her Instagram caption, Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 percent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” She thanked her gynecologist Dr. Neeta Warty and her general practitioner Dr. Sunita Banerjee for their persistent efforts to diagnose the root cause of her pain.

What is Endometriosis?

A chronic disorder known as endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue, which resembles the lining of the uterus, develops outside the organ. This tissue can be found on pelvic organs such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the outer surface of the uterus. Rarely, it may also appear in other parts of the body.

Signs and Symptoms

The symptoms of endometriosis can vary widely among women, but common signs include:

  • Pelvic pain: Often associated with menstrual periods and can be severe.

  • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea): Intense menstrual cramps that may start before and extend several days into the period.

  • Pain during or after sex: Discomfort or pain during intercourse.

  • Pain with bowel movements or urination: Usually experienced during menstrual periods.

  • Excessive bleeding: Heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

  • Infertility: Difficulty in getting pregnant can sometimes be the first sign of endometriosis.

  • Other symptoms: Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, and nausea, especially during menstrual periods.

Endometriosis cramps occur even before the menstruation starts and last through the periods. In contrast, normal period cramps occur after the period starts or on day 1 of the period lasting for the first 2 days. When she feels that the pain is severe, it is important to consult a gynecologist
Dr Shabreen Sahar, MBBS MS OBG

Diagnosis

Diagnosing endometriosis can be challenging and often involves several steps:

  • Medical history: Detailed discussion of symptoms and menstrual cycles.

  • Pelvic exam: Manual examination for abnormalities such as cysts or scars.

  • Imaging tests: Ultrasound, MRI, or CT scans to identify endometrial tissue outside the uterus.

  • Laparoscopy: A surgical procedure where a camera is inserted into the pelvic cavity to directly view and potentially biopsy endometrial tissue. This is considered the most definitive way to diagnose endometriosis.

Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 per cent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” (Representational image: Wikimedia commons)
Understanding Endometriosis: A Silent Condition Impacting Women's Health

Treatment

While there is no cure for endometriosis, various treatments can help manage symptoms:

  • Pain relief: Over-the-counter pain medications like NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen) can help reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Hormonal therapies: These include birth control pills, hormonal IUDs, GnRH agonists, and progestin therapy. These treatments aim to reduce or eliminate menstruation, which can reduce or eliminate symptoms.

  • Surgery: In cases where other treatments are ineffective, surgical options may include laparoscopy to remove endometrial tissue, adhesions, and cysts. Hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) may be considered in severe cases where other treatments have failed.

  • Fertility treatments: For women trying to conceive, treatments such as IVF (in vitro fertilization) may be recommended.

Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 per cent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” (Representational image: Wikimedia commons)
A Non-Invasive Method for Endometriosis Treatment proposed by RUDN

Prevention

It is yet unknown how to prevent endometriosis. However, early diagnosis and management can help alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life. Regular gynecological check-ups and being aware of the symptoms can lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment.

Management

Management of endometriosis focuses on relieving symptoms and may include pain medications, hormonal therapies to suppress menstruation, and surgery to remove endometrial tissue or adhesions. Despite treatment, recurrence is common, and some women may require fertility treatments if they wish to conceive. Endometriosis can significantly impact quality of life, necessitating a multidisciplinary approach involving gynecologists, pain specialists, and mental health support.

References:

  1. Cramer, D. W., & Missmer, S. A. (2002). The epidemiology of endometriosis. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 955(1), 11–22. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2002.tb02761.x

  2. Eskenazi, B., & Warner, M. L. (1997). Epidemiology of endometriosis. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America, 24(2), 235–258. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0889-8545(05)70302-8

  3. Olive, D. L., & Pritts, E. A. (2001). Treatment of endometriosis. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(4), 266–275. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM200107263450407

(Input from various media sources)

(Rehash/ Susmita Bhandary/MSM)

Shamita revealed, “Did you know that almost 40 per cent of women suffer from endometriosis, and most of us are unaware of this disease!” (Representational image: Wikimedia commons)
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