Snake Catcher in Rajasthan dies after being bitten by a Cobra

Vinod Tiwari was referred to locally as "Snake Man." On Sunday, several people showed up for his funeral.
According to the locals, after catching the snakes, he used to release them in the forest (Unsplash)
According to the locals, after catching the snakes, he used to release them in the forest (Unsplash)

In the Churu district of Rajasthan, Vinod Tiwari has been catching snakes for over 20 years. According to the locals, after catching the snakes, he used to release them in the forest. Tiwari passed away on Saturday as a result of a poisonous cobra bite. He was 45.

This Indian King Cobra (Scientific name: Naja Naja)  (Unsplash)
This Indian King Cobra (Scientific name: Naja Naja) (Unsplash)

The event was caught on a neighbouring CCTV camera. On Saturday morning in Churu's Gogamedi neighbourhood, Tiwari can be seen in the video grabbing a snake in front of a store.

When he attempts to put the snake in the bag, he is bitten. Minutes after being bitten by the poisonous Cobra, he passed away.

The word “Snake” is associated with fake, untrustworthy, and deceitful, for a reason. No matter the amount of experience or confidence, some things are just bound to happen. Cobras or Naja Naja are extremely dreadful and poisonous snakes. Cobra venom is neurotoxic, i.e it can lead to paralysis and can kill you within a few minutes, like in this case. It is crucial to inject appropriate anti-venom as soon as possible.
Dr. Darshit Patel, MD, Mumbai
Postsynaptic neurotoxins found in the venom of elapids move quickly through the circulation of their victims, leading to respiratory failure and, eventually, death (Unsplash)
Postsynaptic neurotoxins found in the venom of elapids move quickly through the circulation of their victims, leading to respiratory failure and, eventually, death (Unsplash)

Cobras use a variety of techniques to inject their victim with lethal venom. Some cobras have the ability to spit poison into a victim's eyes, causing blindness and excruciating suffering. However, injecting venom into a victim's body through a bite is the most typical and well-known means of doing so.

There are about 270 species of cobras and their relatives, which are part of the subgroup of snakes known as Elapids. Postsynaptic neurotoxins found in the venom of elapids move quickly through the circulation of their victims, leading to respiratory failure and, eventually, death.

Acetylcholine molecules are conveyed from nerve terminals surrounding the diaphragm muscle, and cobra venom is an example of a chemical that prevents these molecules from interacting with the receptor sites on the diaphragm muscle. 

By reacting with the receptor sites instead of the acetylcholine molecules, the venom blocks the receptor sites and disturbs the neuromuscular junctions involved in human respiration.

With inputs from various media reports.

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