A New Study Shows Allergy can be Related to Cardiac Diseases!

The history of various allergic disorders may cause an increased risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases
A depiction of allergies. (Wikipedia commons)
A depiction of allergies. (Wikipedia commons)

Data from the National Health Interview Survey demonstrated adults with a history of allergic disorders have an increased risk of high blood pressure and coronary heart disease, with the highest risk seen in Black male adults. The study is being presented at ACC Asia 2022 Together with the Korean Society of Cardiology Spring Conference on April 15-16, 2022.

“For patients with allergic disorders, routine evaluation of blood pressure and routine examination for coronary heart disease should be given by clinicians to ensure early treatments are given to those with hypertension or coronary heart disease,” said Yang Guo, PhD, Department of Dermatology at the Institute of Dermatology at Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen Peking University-The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Medical Center, and the study’s lead author.

Previous studies reported an association between allergic disorders and cardiovascular disease, which remain controversial findings, Guo said. The current study aimed to determine whether adults with allergic disorders have increased cardiovascular risk.

An example of a hypersensitivity reaction on the hands from the use of topical anaesthesia. Wikipedia commons
An example of a hypersensitivity reaction on the hands from the use of topical anaesthesia. Wikipedia commons

The study used 2012 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which is a cross-sectional survey of the United States population. The allergic group included adults with at least one allergic disorder, including asthma, respiratory allergy, digestive allergy, skin allergy and other allergy. Overall, the study included 34,417 adults, over half of whom were women and averaged 48.5 years old. The allergic group included 10,045 adults. The researchers adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol drinking and body mass index; they also examined subgroups stratified by demographic 

The researchers found a history of allergic disorders was associated with increased risk of developing high blood pressure and coronary heart disease. In further analyses, individuals with a history of allergic disorders between ages 18 and 57 had a higher risk of high blood pressure. A higher risk of coronary heart disease was seen in study participants who were between ages 39-57, male and Black/African American. Asthma contributed most to the risk of high blood pressure and coronary heart disease.

“Further large cohort studies with long-term follow-up are needed to confirm our findings,” Guo said. “Additionally, appreciating the underlying mechanism may help future management in such individuals.”

Depiction of Asthma and cause (left). Wikipedia Commons
Depiction of Asthma and cause (left). Wikipedia Commons
A depiction of allergies. (Wikipedia commons)
Lifestyle changes reduces heart risk in people with hypertension

The American College of Cardiology envisions a world where innovation and knowledge optimize cardiovascular care and outcomes. As the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team, the mission of the College and its more than 56,000 members is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC bestows credentials upon cardiovascular professionals who meet stringent qualifications and leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College also provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research through its world-renowned JACC Journals, operates national registries to measure and improve care, and offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions. (GN/Newswise)

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