Serum Institute's qHPV vaccine against cervical cancer

The Drugs Controller General of India's (DCGI) Subject Expert Committee on recommended Serum Institute's indigenously developed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine for cervical cancer patients.
DCGI ecommended Serum Institute's indigenously developed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine for cervical cancer patients (representational image - Wikimedia)
DCGI ecommended Serum Institute's indigenously developed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine for cervical cancer patients (representational image - Wikimedia)

The Drugs Controller General of India's (DCGI) Subject Expert Committee on Wednesday recommended Serum Institute's indigenously developed quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine for cervical cancer patients.

Cervical cancer forms 16.5 percent of the total cancer cases in Indian women (representational image - Wikimedia)
Cervical cancer forms 16.5 percent of the total cancer cases in Indian women (representational image - Wikimedia)

"An expert panel of India's central drug authority on Wednesday recommended granting of market authorisation to Serum Institute of India's indigenously-developed India's first quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (qHPV) against cervical cancer," a source said.

The vaccine has been recommended for cervical cancer patients - those above 9 years to 26 years of age - for both male and female.

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According to the source, an application has also been sent to the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (NTAGI) and it may take the final decision on the HPV vaccine in the next meeting scheduled to be held on June 29.

The vaccine has been recommended for cervical cancer patients - those above 9 years to 26 years of age - for both male and female (representational image - Wikimedia)
The vaccine has been recommended for cervical cancer patients - those above 9 years to 26 years of age - for both male and female (representational image - Wikimedia)Ted Eytan

Cervical cancer forms 16.5 percent of the total cancer cases in Indian women and is the second most common type of cancer amongst women in the country after breast cancer. It is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus that is generally transmitted through sexual contact.(AS/NewsGram)

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