Samantha Suffering from Myositis: Let's Know About this Disease

I was hoping to share this after it had gone into remission. But it is taking a little longer than I hoped. I am slowly realizing that we don’t always need to put up a strong front, Samantha said.
Samantha Ruth Prabhu announced in her most recent Twitter post on Sunday that she has been diagnosed with myositis.
Samantha Ruth Prabhu announced in her most recent Twitter post on Sunday that she has been diagnosed with myositis.Image Source: Samantha Ruth Prabhu Official Twitter Handle

Samantha Ruth Prabhu announced in her most recent Twitter post on Sunday that she has been diagnosed with myositis, an autoimmune disease that causes muscle weakness. "The doctors are confident that I will make a complete recovery very soon," the actress stated.

Actor Chiranjeevi posted a letter to Samantha Ruth Prabhu on Twitter wishing her a speedy recovery.

What is Myositis?

Myositis is an auto-immune disease where the body's immune system attacks the muscles, resulting in inflammation, weakness, and pain. Two specific types are polymyositis and dermatomyositis.

It can be caused due to an injury, infection, or an autoimmune disease. Polymyositis causes muscle weakness, particularly in the shoulder, hips, and thigh muscles while dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and skin rashes.

Polymyositis causes muscle weakness, particularly in the shoulder, hips, and thigh muscles.
Polymyositis causes muscle weakness, particularly in the shoulder, hips, and thigh muscles.Wikimedia Commons

SYMPTOMS

Slow-onset symptoms of weakness, swelling, and muscle damage often are common. Other symptoms of myositis may include:-

  • Fatigue after walking or standing

  • Tripping or falling

  • Trouble swallowing or breathing

  • Aching or painful muscles and feeling very tired

Samantha Ruth Prabhu announced in her most recent Twitter post on Sunday that she has been diagnosed with myositis.
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DIAGNOSIS

Diagnosis can be done with help of medical history and physical examination. It may also include:-

  • Blood tests, to check the increased levels of antibodies

  • Muscle and skin biopsies, to check the level of damage and inflammation and other changes to the skin

  • MRI Scan, to know the place of inflammation

  • EMG (Electromyography)

MRI Scan to know the place of inflammation in myositis.
MRI Scan to know the place of inflammation in myositis.Unsplash

TREATMENT

There is no cure for myositis but a combination of therapy and medications can control the symptoms.

First-line treatment - Steroids (high dose) in form of tablets and injections.

Bisphosphonates are given along with steroids to slow bone loss as chronic use of steroids leads to osteoporosis.

The symptoms may reappear once the dose of the steroid is lowered. In such cases, DMARDs(Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs) like methotrexate, cyclosporine, etc. may be prescribed.

Regular blood test is required to check any possible side effect of drugs.
Regular blood test is required to check any possible side effect of drugs.Unsplash

Regular blood test is required to check any possible side effects of drugs.

Biological therapy may be given in cases when DMARDs are not effective. It works by blocking specific targets causing inflammation.

Treatment is usually effective even in severe cases of myositis, although many people need lifelong drug treatment to keep their condition under control.

Samantha Ruth Prabhu announced in her most recent Twitter post on Sunday that she has been diagnosed with myositis.
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While your myositis is very active, resting is probably the best option, but once it has calmed down, regular exercise and physiotherapy can greatly improve your symptoms and health.

Disclaimer: Always consult a physician before following any medical advice or taking any medication. Don't take any medication until prescribed by your doctor thyself.

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