Dr. Prerna Yadav, MDS in Pediatric Dentistry from Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Science & Research, Faridabad, Haryana, India Faridabad, Haryana, India
Dr. Prerna Yadav, MDS in Pediatric Dentistry from Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Science & Research, Faridabad, Haryana, India Faridabad, Haryana, India

Building Bright Smiles: Dr. Prerna Yadav's Journey in Pediatric Dentistry (Part - 2)

From Academics to Practice: Dr. Prerna Yadav's Career in Pediatric Dentistry

Dr. Prerna Yadav is a Senior Consultant at Medanta. She is a Pediatric Dentist with an impressive academic background, holding an MDS in Pediatric Dentistry from Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Science & Research, Faridabad, Haryana, India.

Practicing in Gurgaon since 2010, Dr. Yadav has built a remarkable career dedicated to pediatric dental care. Her ability to connect effortlessly with her young patients has earned her a special place in the hearts of many families. She finds immense satisfaction in bringing smiles to the faces of her tiny tots, ensuring they receive the best possible care and education about their dental health.

Join us as we explore Dr. Yadav's expert insights on the importance of pediatric dentistry, the role of fluoride in children's dental care, and valuable tips for parents to help maintain their children's oral health.

Check out Part-1 of this interview!

Q

Himani: I have a question that's a little different, regarding career options in dentistry. Right now, there are many internships available on Med Bound Times, including a writing internship. I've noticed a current trend where many dentists are choosing to pursue careers abroad, often in public health or other fields unrelated to dentistry. When I asked about this, I was told that the main reason for this trend is the low pay scale after completing their courses, often around 10k-12k, and they may even have to train for free in order to gain experience. This seems to be the general sentiment among students and professionals I've spoken to. It seems that those who are patient and willing to wait it out may find success in the field, but many are choosing to switch to public health or writing. I'm curious about your thoughts on why so many dentists are pursuing careers in public health.

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: The root cause of the problem is that students are pursuing dentistry without understanding the future prospects of the field. This could be because they are not able to secure admission to a medical college for MBBS and end up choosing BDS as a fallback option. While there is a high demand for dentists in other countries, the situation is quite different in India where there is an oversaturation of dental clinics in metropolitan areas, but a severe lack of facilities and professionals in rural areas. The government needs to allocate more resources to improve the infrastructure of government hospitals and dental clinics, as well as create more opportunities for dentists. Currently, many dentists are driven by the desire to earn a high income rather than a genuine interest in the field, which can lead to a deterioration in the quality of dental care. Despite the challenges, dentists who are dedicated and patient can eventually find success in their career, especially if they are willing to work hard and persevere.

Q

We discussed the importance of raising awareness about a certain issue. I believe that without widespread awareness, it's difficult for anyone, including the government, to take effective action. We need to focus on educating people so that preventive measures can be taken, potentially avoiding many problems. I read a research paper that highlighted the connection between oral health and gut health, as well as other issues. It's clear that there are many interconnected factors at play. How can we spread awareness on a large scale? If people are more informed, they are more likely to seek medical help when needed. What can individuals do to contribute to this effort?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: I am very committed to participating in school dentistry programs. I believe that educating children about dental care can have a positive impact on their families and the community. By visiting schools and interacting with children, I aim to spread awareness about the importance of oral hygiene. I also encourage more people to get involved in similar volunteer work and hope that NGOs can play a role in mediating these efforts. I strongly believe that doctors and other professionals would be willing to participate in such initiatives aimed at helping underprivileged people.

Q

Himani: Ma'am, can you please explain what is the correct technique for brushing the teeth?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: It's quite simple. There's no big secret to it, nor is there any magic involved. It's common knowledge that a toothbrush is meant for circular motions, yet 80% of Indians use horizontal strokes. We should use vertical or circular strokes. This simple change can make a big difference. Another important point is that this is an underrated aspect of dental care. Our ancestors used to clean their gums with their fingers after eating. So, using your fingers to massage your gums after meals is like brushing for your gums. After brushing your teeth, massage your gums with your fingers. You don't need to apply anything extra - there are products for that, but that's just marketing. Use coconut oil, ideally cold-pressed, as a medium for this gum massage. Also, pay attention to the spaces between your teeth. It's surprising, but 80-90% of cavities in these areas can be prevented by thoroughly massaging your gums after brushing your teeth. It's interesting to know these facts.

Q

Priya: What inspired you to establish your dental practice and how do you manage it on your own dental practice and being a Senior Consultant at Medanta?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: I had an epiphany during my graduation days when I observed my lecturers, who were a married couple of dentists. They used to come to the dental college together in the morning and leave in the afternoon. Seeing them made me question why they didn't start their own clinic and why the patients didn't come to them for treatment. This experience led me to lose interest in pursuing an academic career and I became determined to establish my own dental clinic, providing comprehensive services under one roof.

Despite my aspirations, fate had other plans for me. I was approached by a senior doctor from Medanta who was opening a hospital and offered me the opportunity to join her and lead the dental department. I eagerly joined her and within two years, Medanta Hospital took over the hospital we were working at, making us a part of Medanta. Now, I manage my private practice and also work at Medanta in the mornings, while overseeing my own practice in the evenings. It's a fulfilling and busy life.

Q

Priya: What motivated you to pursue an MDS in Pediatric Dentistry? Was it something that you wanted to do? Or was it something that you were interested in?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: One thing that has been consistent throughout my life is my love for interacting with small children. Even as a child, I preferred playing with younger kids over older ones. My mother used to wonder why I was so good with children. As I entered my college days, I found Pediatrics to be the most appealing subject. I was drawn to it because I would get to work with small kids and talk to them. Interacting with children always energized me in a unique way. Pediatrics encompasses various clinical aspects, such as treating dental issues like cavities, fillings, and even making dentures for children. It also involves orthodontic work like braces and mini implants. Additionally, Pediatric Dentistry includes procedures like bleaching and using habit-breaking appliances. Furthermore, Pediatrics delves into the psychological aspect of child care, particularly in managing children's behavior. Since childhood, I have always had a good understanding of child psychology and behavior management. Reflecting on these factors, I have come to realize that Pediatrics is the perfect fit for me.

Q

Priya: Can you share a specific case or patient that had a very impact on your life? It changes your approach towards other things.

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: There are cases that come to impress me. When the doctor is happy, he brings something for the next visit. So, I remember my first patient who surprised me. I was treating adult patients. I had not kept Pediatrics that day. So, I was treating adult patients. Suddenly, around 8 pm, she knocked on my working chamber. I opened and she was standing with a card in her hand. She had written, you are the best doctor I have ever met. She hugged me and kissed me. So, that moment of love that I experienced with my patient was very touching. She tested my patience so much that she made 8 dental visits to sit on the chair. After that, she made unlimited visits to the treatment routes. I cannot even tell the number of visits she did. But she tested my patience. That is the reason I guess she also knew that I have tested the doctor a lot. Then, she brought this card. It was very touching.

Q

Priya: How do you stay updated with the latest advancements in your field?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: Our society has a journal called JISP (Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology). It is a quarterly journal. I read that journal very well. I read all the articles. My husband is in academics. So, he is into research always. I go to college with him whenever I find a topic interesting. Secondly, our IDA (Indian Dental Association) Gurgaon branch is very active. Every month, we have CDE (Continuing Dental Education) programs. We attend those programs. We have been given membership. I keep myself updated on all these things.

Q

Priya: At the beginning of the interview, you said that there are a lot of dental myths. What are the dental myths that people should be aware of?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: The common misconceptions about dental care need to be clarified. Firstly, it is recommended to start brushing teeth at the age of 3-4 to avoid damage. It is a myth that we should not brush our teeth until all baby teeth are replaced. In reality, we should start brushing as soon as a single tooth emerges. Additionally, during pregnancy, hormonal changes can lead to increased gum issues, making dental care even more crucial. Regular cleaning sessions every 3 months are important for pregnant women to prevent the transfer of harmful bacteria to the child. Another misconception is that if one tooth is infected, all teeth are infected. In fact, infectious content spreads through saliva, and oral health maintenance, including regular checkups and scaling sessions, can balance the bacteria levels in the mouth.

Q

Himani: I have a question about the common practice of dealing with loose milk teeth. When a child's milk tooth is loose, it's often suggested to either encourage it to fall out by wiggling it, tying a thread around it to pull it out, or getting braces to help it come out. Is this the right approach? Should we just let the tooth fall out on its own if it's loose, or is it okay to use these methods to help it come out?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: So, when the tooth is moving and the child eats food, the tooth is moving again. The child has pain in the gums due to the mobile tooth. That's why he starts getting irritated. Let the natural tooth shed off. When the tooth is moving, there are mobility grades. If the tooth is slightly moving, let it be. If the tooth is moving more, let it be. But when the tooth is completely moving, there is no use in keeping it. If you can get the tooth pulled out, then hold it with cotton and pull it out. If your permanent teeth have come, especially in the lower teeth, the permanent teeth come towards the back and the permanent teeth do not move. So, this is a very common presentation of parents. Keep the middle teeth in the front and the permanent teeth in the back. In that condition, we have to remove those teeth when the permanent teeth show their face.

Q

Priya: Ma'am, you have done MDS from Pandit B.D. Sharma, from Rohtak. And now you are practicing in Gurgaon. What difference have you noticed in the patient load? Of course, in the government sector, there will be more patient load. What type of patients used to come and what type of disease was common there and here? Can you tell us a little?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: In colleges, I would say that there are a lot of problems related to gums. Gum issues or Pyorrhea, which we call in the normal language, but it is gingivitis and periodontitis which are very common in our rural sector. And in city practice, we have more cosmetic work. Root canal, cappings, veneers. A root canal is still a treatment part, but veneering in cosmetics, caps, braces, and implants creates more hype in these cities. But in the rural sector, the basics are still the same because they don't brush. The work is still going on without brushing. So that problem is very prevalent in the rural sector that gums health is very important.

Q

Priya: What are some tips and tricks that you would like to give on how to have healthy gums? How can people prevent gums?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: I would like to tell you the correct timing of brushing. If you brush at night, within 15 minutes of your dinner, then only drink water and not milk. After brushing, you can't drink anything. Drink water and go to sleep. Do not brush as soon as you wake up. Right? You have to brush after breakfast. So if you are brushing at night, after brushing, massage your muscles and wash your face with salt water. These are the three steps. After that, you are sleeping. Your mouth is completely clean. There is no food deposit. There will be no unnecessary bacterial load on your teeth. If you wake up in the morning, there is a 110% guarantee that if your stomach is fine, and you don't have constipation, then you will feel completely fresh. You won't have to brush or eat anything. That thing will stop if you clean your oral cavity by doing 3-4 steps at night. So, when you wake up in the morning, you have to take plain water. Drink 2-3 glasses of water and send the bacteria that travel in your gut back to your gut. It is said that saliva is very healthy in the morning. It is healthy because the bacteria travel in your gut. We don't have to waste the bacteria by brushing our teeth in the morning. We don't have to do that. We don't have to brush our teeth in the morning. First, drink water. Take breakfast. After that, brush your teeth so that your mouth remains clean from breakfast to lunch. Modify this a little bit. It will bring a lot of changes to your oral cavity. Brush at night and brush after breakfast.

Q

Himani: Ma'am, is there anything else that you want to share? Anything important that we haven't touched yet? Related to pediatric dentistry? Related dentistry or anything in general you want to share?

A

Dr. Prerna Yadav: In general, I would like to share that people in cities these days are in a hurry to get braces for their children. Even for braces, there is an age and stage.

I feel, that permanent teeth come after that because our jaw grows. It is wide. The size of the teeth never increases.

The size of the teeth you got when you were 6 years old is the same. That's why in the beginning when permanent teeth come, their teeth look big. It looks like they have big teeth. But when the face grows, the jaw bone grows along with that the size of the teeth doesn't look good. So for braces, I would definitely say that there is no hurry. We are giving braces even at the age of 40. And the treatments are going on successfully. So don't get braces very soon. As a general awareness, I would like to say this.

There is no magic in dental health. Go for scaling once a year. Follow my tips on cleaning techniques.

MedBound Times expresses sincere gratitude to Dr. Prerna Yadav for sharing her valuable insights on our platform.

Dr. Prerna Yadav, MDS in Pediatric Dentistry from Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Science & Research, Faridabad, Haryana, India Faridabad, Haryana, India
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